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Jeff Manza

Professor of Sociology

Ph.D. 1995, M.A. 1989, B.A. 1984 (Sociology), University of California, Berkeley.

Office Address: 

295 Lafayette St., 4144

Office Hours: 

By Appointment

Phone: 

(212) 998-8935

Areas of Research/Interest: 

Social inequality, political sociology, and public policy.

Click here to download the abbreviated CV

Curriculum Vitae


 Books:

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Jeff Manza and Christopher Uggen. Locked Out:  Felon Disenfranchisement and American Democracy. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

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Clem Brooks and Jeff Manza. Why Welfare States Persist. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007.

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Jeff Manza and Clem Brooks, Social Cleavages and Political Change:  Voter Alignments and U.S. Party Coalitions. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

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Jeff Manza, Fay Lomax Cook, and Benjamin Page (eds.). Navigating Public Opinion: Polls, Policy, and the Future of American Democracy. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002.

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Jeff Manza and Michael Sauder (eds.). Inequality and Society: Social  Science Perspectives on Social Stratification. New York: Norton, 2009.


Articles:

Leslie McCall and Jeff Manza. ‘Class Differences in Social and Political Attitudes in America.’ Forthcoming in Oxford Handbook of American Public Opinion and the Media, ed. Lawrence Jacobs and Robert Shapiro, pp. 552-570. New York: Oxford University Press.

Jeff Manza. ‘Liberalism’s Inevitability?’ Society 47 (2010): 477-84.

Jeff Manza and Clem Brooks. ‘Classes and Politics.’ In Social Class: How Does It Work?, ed. Annette Lareau and Dalton Conley, pp. 201-31. New York: Russell Sage Foundation Press (2008).

Clem Brooks and Jeff Manza. ‘Social Policy Responsiveness in the Developed Democracies.' American Sociological Review 71 (2006): 474-94.

Clem Brooks and Jeff Manza. ‘Why Do Welfare States Persist? Social Spending Effort in OECD Democracies Since the 1980s.’ Journal of Politics 68 (2006): 815-26.

Christopher Uggen, Jeff Manza, and Melissa Thompson. ‘Citizenship and Reintegration: The Socioeconomic, Familial, and Civic Lives of Criminal Offenders.’ The Annals of the American Academy of Social and Political Science 605 (2006): 281-310.

Paul Nieuwbeerta, Clem Brooks, and Jeff Manza. ‘Cleavage-Based Voting in Cross-National Perspective: Evidence From Six Countries.’ Social Science Research 35 (2006): 88-128.

Christopher Uggen, Angela Behrens, and Jeff Manza. ‘Criminal Disenfranchisement.’ Annual Review of Law and Social Science 1 (2005): 307-22.

Clem Brooks and Jeff Manza. ‘A Great Divide? Religion and Political Change in U.S. National Elections, 1972 - 2000.’ The Sociological Quarterly 45 (2004): 421-50.

Christopher Uggen and Jeff Manza. ‘Voting and Subsequent Crime and Arrest: Evidence from a Community Sample.’ Columbia Human Rights Law Review 36 (2004): 193-215.

Jeff Manza, Clem Brooks, and Christopher Uggen. ‘Public Attitudes Towards Felon Disenfranchisement Laws in the United States.’ Public Opinion Quarterly 68 (2004): 276-87.

Jeff Manza and Christopher Uggen. ‘Punishment and Democracy: The Voting Rights of Nonincarcerated Criminal Offenders in the United States.’ Institute for Policy Research Working Paper 04-03, Fall 2004.

Angela Behrens, Christopher Uggen, and Jeff Manza.‘Ballot Manipulation and the “Menace of Negro Domination”: Racial Threat and Felon Disenfranchisement in the United States, 1850-2000.’ American Journal of Sociology 109 (2003): 559-605.

Christopher Uggen and Jeff Manza. ‘Democratic Contraction? The Political Consequences of Felon Disenfranchisement in the United States.’ American Sociological Review 67 (2002): 777-803.

Jeff Manza and Fay Lomax Cook. ‘A Democratic Polity? Three Views of Policy Responsiveness to Public Opinion in the United States.’ American Political Research 30 (2002): 630-67.

Jeff Manza. ‘Political Sociological Models of the U.S. New Deal.’ Annual Review of Sociology 26 (2000): 297-322.

Jeff Manza. ‘Race and the Underdevelopment of the American Welfare State.' Theory and Society 30 (2000): 819-32.

Jeff Manza and Debbie Van Schyndel. ‘Still the Missing Feminist Revolution? Inequalities of Race, Class, and Gender in Introductory Texts.’ [Comment on Ferree and Hall, ASR Dec 1996]. American Sociological Review 64 (2000): 468-75.

Jeff Manza and Clem Brooks. ‘Group Size, Turnout, and Alignments in the Making of U.S. Party Coalitions, 1960-1992.’ European Sociological Review 15 (1999): 369-90.

Jeff Manza and Clem Brooks. ‘The Gender Gap in U.S. Presidential Elections: When? Why? Implications?’ American Journal of Sociology 103 (March 1998): 1235-66.

Jeff Manza and Clem Brooks. ‘The Religious Factor in U.S. Presidential Elections, 1960-1992.’ American Journal of Sociology 103 (July 1997): 38- 81.

Clem Brooks and Jeff Manza.‘The Social and Ideological Bases of Middle Class Political Alignments in the United States, 1972-92.’ American Sociological Review 62 (April 1997): 191-208.

Clem Brooks and Jeff Manza. ‘Social Cleavages and Political Alignments: U.S. Presidential Elections, 1960-1992.’ American Sociological Review 62 (December 1997): 937-46.

Clem Brooks and Jeff Manza. ‘Class Politics and Political Change in the United States, 1952-1992.’ Social Forces 76 (December 1997): 379-409.

Michael Hout, Clem Brooks and Jeff Manza. ‘The Democratic Class Struggle in the United States, 1948-92.’ American Sociological Review 60 (1995): 805-28.

Clem Brooks and Jeff Manza. ‘Do Changing Values Explain the New Politics? A Critical Assessment of the Postmaterialist Thesis.’ The Sociological Quarterly 35 (December 1994): 541-70.

Michael Hout, Clem Brooks and Jeff Manza.‘The Persistence of Classes in Postindustrial Society.’ International Sociology 8 (September 1993): 259-77.


Updated on 08/14/2014